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Morphine oral solution (liquid) comes in three different concentrations (amount of medication contained in a given amount of solution).


Description

Morphine Description

Morphine, the main alkaloid of opium, was first obtained from poppy seeds in 1805.1 It is a potent analgesic, though its use is limited due to tolerance, withdrawal, and the risk of abuse.2 Morphine is still routinely used today, though there are a number of semi-synthetic opioids of varying strength such as codeinefentanylmethadonehydrocodonehydromorphonemeperidine, and oxycodone.

Morphine was granted FDA approval in 1941.13

Morphine
Morphin - Morphine.svg
Morphine-from-xtal-3D-balls.png
Clinical data
Pronunciation /ˈmrfn/
Trade names Statex, MSContin, Oramorph, Sevredol, and others[1]
AHFS/Drugs.com Monograph
Pregnancy
category
Dependence
liability
High
Addiction
liability
High[3]
Routes of
administration
Inhalation (smoking), insufflation (snorting), by mouth (PO), rectalsubcutaneous (SC), intramuscular (IM), intravenous (IV), epidural, and intrathecal (IT)
Drug class opioid
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 20–40% (by mouth), 36–71% (rectally),[4] 100% (IV/IM)
Protein binding 30–40%
Metabolism Hepatic 90%
Onset of action 5 minutes (IV), 15 minutes (IM),[5] 20 minutes (PO)[6]
Elimination half-life 2–3 hours
Duration of action 3–7 hours[7][8]
Excretion Renal 90%, biliary 10%
Identifiers
CAS Number
  • 57-27-2 check
    64-31-3 (neutral sulfate),
    52-26-6 (hydrochloride)
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
PDB ligand
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.291 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
Formula C17H19NO3
Molar mass 285.343 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
Solubility in water HCl & sulf.: 60 mg/mL (20 °C)
  (verify)

This drug is a pain medication of the opiate family that is found naturally in a number of plants and animals, including humans.[7][9] It acts directly on the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease the feeling of pain.[7] It can be taken for both acute pain and chronic pain and is frequently used for pain from myocardial infarctionkidney stones, and during labor.[7] Morphine can be administered by mouth, by injection into a muscle, by injection under the skinintravenouslyinjection into the space around the spinal cord, or rectally.[7] Its maximum effect is reached after about 20 minutes when administered intravenously and 60 minutes when administered by mouth, while the duration of its effect is 3–7 hours.[7][8] Long-acting formulations of morphine also exist.[7]

Potentially serious side effects of morphine include decreased respiratory effort and low blood pressure.[7] Morphine is addictive and prone to abuse.[7] If one’s dose is reduced after long-term use, opioid withdrawal symptoms may occur.[7] Common side effects of morphine include drowsiness, vomiting, and constipation.[7] Caution is advised for use of morphine during pregnancy or breast feeding, as it may affect the health of the baby.[7][2]

Morphine was first isolated between 1803 and 1805 by German pharmacist Friedrich Sertürner.[10] This is generally believed to be the first isolation of an active ingredient from a plant.[11] Merck began marketing it commercially in 1827.[10] Morphine was more widely used after the invention of the hypodermic syringe in 1853–1855.[10][12] Sertürner originally named the substance morphium, after the Greek god of dreams, Morpheus, as it has a tendency to cause sleep.[12][13]

The primary source of morphine is isolation from poppy straw of the opium poppy.[14] In 2013, approximately 523 tons of morphine were produced.[15] Approximately 45 tons were used directly for pain, a four-fold increase over the last twenty years.[15] Most use for this purpose was in the developed world.[15] About 70 percent of morphine is used to make other opioids such as hydromorphoneoxymorphone, and heroin.[15][16][17] It is a Schedule II drug in the United States,[16] Class A in the United Kingdom,[18] and Schedule I in Canada.[19] It is also on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines.

Medical uses[edit]

Pain[edit]

This drug is used primarily to treat both acute and chronic severe pain. Its duration of analgesia is about three to seven hours.[7][8] Side-effects of nausea and constipation are rarely severe enough to warrant stopping treatment.

It is used for pain due to myocardial infarction and for labor pains.[23] However, concerns exist that morphine may increase mortality in the event of non ST elevation myocardial infarction.[24] Morphine has also traditionally been used in the treatment of acute pulmonary edema.[23] A 2006 review, though, found little evidence to support this practice.[25] A 2016 Cochrane review concluded that morphine is effective in relieving cancer pain.[26]

Shortness of breath[edit]

This drug is beneficial in reducing the symptom of shortness of breath due to both cancer and noncancer causes.[27][28] In the setting of breathlessness at rest or on minimal exertion from conditions such as advanced cancer or end-stage cardiorespiratory diseases, regular, low-dose sustained-release morphine significantly reduces breathlessness safely, with its benefits maintained over time.[29][30]

Opioid use disorder[edit]

This drug is also available as a slow-release formulation for opiate substitution therapy (OST) in Austria, Germany, Bulgaria, Slovenia, and Canada for addicts who cannot tolerate either methadone or buprenorphine.[31]

Contraindications[edit]

Relative contraindications to morphine include:

Adverse effects[edit]

Adverse effects of opioids
Common and short term
Other

A localized reaction to intravenous morphine caused by histamine release in the veins

Constipation[edit]

Like loperamide and other opioids, morphine acts on the myenteric plexus in the intestinal tract, reducing gut motility, causing constipation. The gastrointestinal effects of morphine are mediated primarily by μ-opioid receptors in the bowel. By inhibiting gastric emptying and reducing propulsive peristalsis of the intestine, morphine decreases the rate of intestinal transit. Reduction in gut secretion and increased intestinal fluid absorption also contribute to the constipating effect. Opioids also may act on the gut indirectly through tonic gut spasms after inhibition of nitric oxide generation.[34] This effect was shown in animals when a nitric oxide precursor, L-arginine, reversed morphine-induced changes in gut motility.[35]

Hormone imbalance[edit]

Clinical studies consistently conclude that morphine, like other opioids, often causes hypogonadism and hormone imbalances in chronic users of both sexes. This side effect is dose-dependent and occurs in both therapeutic and recreational users. Morphine can interfere with menstruation in women by suppressing levels of luteinizing hormone. Many studies suggest the majority (perhaps as many as 90%) of chronic opioid users have opioid-induced hypogonadism. This effect may cause the increased likelihood of osteoporosis and bone fracture observed in chronic morphine users. Studies suggest the effect is temporary. As of 2013, the effect of low-dose or acute use of morphine on the endocrine system is unclear.[36][37]

Effects on human performance[edit]

Most reviews conclude that opioids produce minimal impairment of human performance on tests of sensory, motor, or attentional abilities. However, recent studies have been able to show some impairments caused by morphine, which is not surprising, given that morphine is a central nervous system depressant. Morphine has resulted in impaired functioning on critical flicker frequency (a measure of overall CNS arousal) and impaired performance on the Maddox wing test (a measure of the deviation of the visual axes of the eyes). Few studies have investigated the effects of morphine on motor abilities; a high dose of morphine can impair finger tapping and the ability to maintain a low constant level of isometric force (i.e. fine motor control is impaired),[38] though no studies have shown a correlation between morphine and gross motor abilities.

In terms of cognitive abilities, one study has shown that morphine may have a negative impact on anterograde and retrograde memory,[39] but these effects are minimal and transient. Overall, it seems that acute doses of opioids in non-tolerant subjects produce minor effects in some sensory and motor abilities, and perhaps also in attention and cognition. It is likely that the effects of morphine will be more pronounced in opioid-naive subjects than chronic opioid users.

In chronic opioid users, such as those on Chronic Opioid Analgesic Therapy (COAT) for managing severe, chronic pain, behavioural testing has shown normal functioning on perception, cognition, coordination and behaviour in most cases. One 2000 study[40] analysed COAT patients to determine whether they were able to safely operate a motor vehicle. The findings from this study suggest that stable opioid use does not significantly impair abilities inherent in driving (this includes physical, cognitive and perceptual skills). COAT patients showed rapid completion of tasks that require the speed of responding for successful performance (e.g., Rey Complex Figure Test) but made more errors than controls. COAT patients showed no deficits in visual-spatial perception and organization (as shown in the WAIS-R Block Design Test) but did show impaired immediate and short-term visual memory (as shown on the Rey Complex Figure Test – Recall). These patients showed no impairments in higher-order cognitive abilities (i.e., planning). COAT patients appeared to have difficulty following instructions and showed a propensity toward impulsive behaviour, yet this did not reach statistical significance. It is important to note that this study reveals that COAT patients have no domain-specific deficits, which supports the notion that chronic opioid use has minor effects on psychomotorcognitive, or neuropsychological functioning.

Reinforcement disorders[edit]

Addiction[edit]

Before the Morphine by Santiago Rusiñol

This drug is a highly addictive substance. In controlled studies comparing the physiological and subjective effects of heroin and morphine in individuals formerly addicted to opiates, subjects showed no preference for one drug over the other. Equipotent, injected doses had comparable action courses, with no difference in subjects’ self-rated feelings of euphoria, ambition, nervousness, relaxation, drowsiness, or sleepiness.[41] Short-term addiction studies by the same researchers demonstrated that tolerance developed at a similar rate to both heroin and morphine. When compared to the opioids hydromorphonefentanyloxycodone, and pethidine/meperidine, former addicts showed a strong preference for heroin and morphine, suggesting that heroin and morphine are particularly susceptible to abuse and addiction. Morphine and heroin were also much more likely to produce euphoria and other positive subjective effects when compared to these other opioids.[41] The choice of heroin and morphine over other opioids by former drug addicts may also be because heroin (also known as morphine diacetate, diamorphine, or diacetyl morphine) is an ester of morphine and a morphine prodrug, essentially meaning they are identical drugs in vivo. Heroin is converted to morphine before binding to the opioid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, where morphine causes the subjective effects, which is what the addicted individuals are seeking.[42]

Tolerance[edit]

Several hypotheses are given about how tolerance develops, including opioid receptor phosphorylation (which would change the receptor conformation), functional decoupling of receptors from G-proteins (leading to receptor desensitization),[43] μ-opioid receptor internalization or receptor down-regulation (reducing the number of available receptors for morphine to act on), and upregulation of the cAMP pathway (a counterregulatory mechanism to opioid effects) (For a review of these processes, see Koch and Hollt.[44]CCK might mediate some counter-regulatory pathways responsible for opioid tolerance. CCK-antagonist drugs, specifically proglumide, have been shown to slow the development of tolerance to morphine.

Dependence and withdrawal[edit]

Cessation of dosing with morphine creates the prototypical opioid withdrawal syndrome, which, unlike that of barbituratesbenzodiazepinesalcohol, or sedative-hypnotics, is not fatal by itself in otherwise healthy people.

Acute morphine withdrawal, along with that of any other opioid, proceeds through a number of stages. Other opioids differ in the intensity and length of each, and weak opioids and mixed agonist-antagonists may have acute withdrawal syndromes that do not reach the highest level. As commonly cited[by whom?], they are:

  • Stage I, 6 h to 14 h after last dose: Drug craving, anxiety, irritability, perspiration, and mild to moderate dysphoria
  • Stage II, 14 h to 18 h after last dose: Yawning, heavy perspiration, mild depression, lacrimation, crying, headaches, runny nose, dysphoria, also intensification of the above symptoms, “yen sleep” (a waking trance-like state)
  • Stage III, 16 h to 24 h after last dose: Rhinorrhea (runny nose) and increase in other of the above, dilated pupils, piloerection (goose bumps – a purported origin of the phrase, ‘cold turkey,’ but in fact the phrase originated outside of drug treatment),[45] muscle twitches, hot flashes, cold flashes, aching bones and muscles, loss of appetite, and the beginning of intestinal cramping
  • Stage IV, 24 h to 36 h after last dose: Increase in all of the above including severe cramping and involuntary leg movements (“kicking the habit” also called restless leg syndrome), loose stool, insomnia, elevation of blood pressure, moderate elevation in body temperature, increase in frequency of breathing and tidal volume, tachycardia (elevated pulse), restlessness, nausea
  • Stage V, 36 h to 72 h after last dose: Increase in the above, fetal position, vomiting, free and frequent liquid diarrhea, which sometimes can accelerate the time of passage of food from mouth to out of system, weight loss of 2 kg to 5 kg per 24 h, increased white cell count, and other blood changes
  • Stage VI, after completion of above: Recovery of appetite and normal bowel function, beginning of transition to postacute and chronic symptoms that are mainly psychological, but may also include increased sensitivity to pain, hypertension, colitis or other gastrointestinal afflictions related to motility, and problems with weight control in either direction

In advanced stages of withdrawal, ultrasonographic evidence of pancreatitis has been demonstrated in some patients and is presumably attributed to spasm of the pancreatic sphincter of Oddi.[46]

The withdrawal symptoms associated with morphine addiction are usually experienced shortly before the time of the next scheduled dose, sometimes within as early as a few hours (usually 6 h to 12 h) after the last administration. Early symptoms include watery eyes, insomnia, diarrhea, runny nose, yawning, dysphoria, sweating, and in some cases a strong drug craving. Severe headache, restlessness, irritability, loss of appetite, body aches, severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, tremors, and even stronger and more intense drug craving appear as the syndrome progresses. Severe depression and vomiting are very common. During the acute withdrawal period, systolic and diastolic blood pressures increase, usually beyond premorphine levels, and heart rate increases,[47] which have potential to cause a heart attack, blood clot, or stroke.

Chills or cold flashes with goose bumps (“cold turkey“) alternating with flushing (hot flashes), kicking movements of the legs (“kicking the habit”[42]) and excessive sweating are also characteristic symptoms.[48] Severe pains in the bones and muscles of the back and extremities occur, as do muscle spasms. At any point during this process, a suitable narcotic can be administered that will dramatically reverse the withdrawal symptoms. Major withdrawal symptoms peak between 48 h and 96 h after the last dose and subside after about 8 to 12 days. Sudden withdrawal by heavily dependent users who are in poor health is very rarely fatal. Morphine withdrawal is considered less dangerous than alcohol, barbiturate, or benzodiazepine withdrawal.[49][50]

The psychological dependence associated with morphine addiction is complex and protracted. Long after the physical need for morphine has passed, the addict will usually continue to think and talk about the use of morphine (or other drugs) and feel strange or overwhelmed coping with daily activities without being under the influence of morphine. Psychological withdrawal from morphine is usually a very long and painful process. Addicts often suffer severe depression, anxiety, insomnia, mood swings, amnesia (forgetfulness), low self-esteem, confusion, paranoia, and other psychological disorders. Without intervention, the syndrome will run its course, and most of the overt physical symptoms will disappear within 7 to 10 days including psychological dependence. A high probability of relapse exists after morphine withdrawal when neither the physical environment nor the behavioral motivators that contributed to the abuse have been altered. Testimony to morphine’s addictive and reinforcing nature is its relapse rate. Abusers of morphine (and heroin) have one of the highest relapse rates among all drug users, ranging up to 98% in the estimation of some medical experts.[51]

Pharmacodynamics

This drug binding to opioid receptors blocks transmission of nociceptive signals, signals pain-modulating neurons in the spinal cord, and inhibits primary afferent nociceptors to the dorsal horn sensory projection cells.1

This drug has a time to onset of 6-30 minutes.1 Excess consumption of morphine and other opioids can lead to changes in synaptic neuroplasticity, including changes in neuron density, changes at postsynaptic sites, and changes at dendritic terminals.3

Intravenous morphine’s analgesic effect is sex dependent. The EC50 in men is 76ng/mL and in women is 22ng/mL.5

Morphine-6-glucuronide is 22 times less potent than morphine in eliciting pupil constriction.5

Mechanism of action

Morphine-6-glucuronide is responsible for approximately 85% of the response observed by morphine administration.4 Morphine and its metabolites act as agonists of the mu and kappa opioid receptors.1 The mu-opioid receptor is integral to morphine’s effects on the ventral tegmental area of the brain. Morphine’s activation of the reward pathway is mediated by agonism of the delta-opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens,2 while modification of the respiratory system and addiction disorder are mediated by agonism of the mu-opioid receptor.3

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